You Can’t Always Get What You Want

Sometimes sales wisdom is found in unexpected places.

These lyrics from the “Rolling Stones” hit song in 1969 are one example:

You can’t always get what you want . . .  you get what you need.”

The lyrics underscore two important concepts, basic to all sales.

1. People will find a way to get what they need.
2. But they would rather have what they want.

The ultimate key to success is to give them both!

To accomplish this, you must know why people buy, not necessarily what they buy.

Question: OK, then why do people buy?
Answer: To fulfill their needs and/or satisfy their wants.

Simple, isn’t it?

This is what lies underneath everything that stimulates, motivates or triggers the buying impulse. Prospects are seeking to get what they need, and if possible, also what they want. Sometimes they are driven more by their needs other times by what they want.  The job of the salesman is to show them that they can have both.

Here’s how you do it: The more needs you can identify – the more they will want you’re offering. Once the prospect sees that you are offering is what they need and want, the sale is closed.

For example, they want to buy a home for the emotional feeling it gives them but tell themselves they need the home as a good investment. If what you’re selling satisfies both objectives, they will close themselves.

Give them what they need and want. The reason this works is because wants and value are relative concepts. Both are based on considerations first, and facts second.

When people really want something, it becomes more valuable and they demand that their wants be satisfied, now!

What people want is their raison d’être – their reason for being. It’s what keeps them going in spite of everything – their motivations, hopes, dreams, and desires, and how these things make them feel. What they need is based on basic survival instincts.

If what you’re selling can help them satisfy both needs and wants, you’ll have a happy customer and a closed deal.

daniel w. jacobs
© 2006-2020, all rights reserved

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